The sun

the sun

Das The Sun begrüßt Sie in Ko Phayam, nur einen kurzen Spaziergang vom Strand entfernt. Genießen Sie eine atemberaubende Aussicht auf den. Die Sun hatte angenommen, Brüssel würde Fachleute für die Führung der wichtigsten Verhandlungen seit Jahrzehnten verpflichten. "Sunrise, sunset. We all build our days around the sun. A lot is written in a year. Some things might change, but life remains bright." Diary with no dates; just.

As the nebula collapsed because of its gravity, it spun faster and flattened into a disk. Most of the material was pulled toward the center to form the sun.

The sun has enough nuclear fuel to stay much as it is now for another 5 billion years. After that, it will swell to become a red giant.

Eventually, it will shed its outer layers, and the remaining core will collapse to become a white dwarf. Slowly, this will fade, to enter its final phase as a dim, cool theoretical object sometimes known as a black dwarf.

The sun and its atmosphere are divided into several zones and layers. The solar interior, from the inside out, is made up of the core, radiative zone and the convective zone.

The solar atmosphere above that consists of the photosphere, chromosphere, a transition region and the corona. Beyond that is the solar wind , an outflow of gas from the corona.

The core extends from the sun's center to about a quarter of the way to its surface. Although it only makes up roughly 2 percent of the sun's volume, it is almost 15 times the density of lead and holds nearly half of the sun's mass.

Next is the radiative zone, which extends from the core to 70 percent of the way to the sun's surface, making up 32 percent of the sun's volume and 48 percent of its mass.

Light from the core gets scattered in this zone, so that a single photon often may take a million years to pass through. The convection zone reaches up to the sun's surface, and makes up 66 percent of the sun's volume but only a little more than 2 percent of its mass.

Roiling "convection cells" of gas dominate this zone. Two main kinds of solar convection cells exist — granulation cells about miles 1, kilometers wide and supergranulation cells about 20, miles 30, km in diameter.

The photosphere is the lowest layer of the sun's atmosphere, and emits the light we see. It is about miles km thick, although most of the light comes from its lowest third.

Temperatures in the photosphere range from 11, F 6, C at bottom to 7, F 4, C at top. Next up is the chromosphere, which is hotter, up to 35, F 19, C , and is apparently made up entirely of spiky structures known as spicules typically some miles 1, km across and up to 6, miles 10, km high.

After that is the transition region a few hundred to a few thousand miles thick, which is heated by the corona above it and sheds most of its light as ultraviolet rays.

At the top is the super-hot corona, which is made of structures such as loops and streams of ionized gas.

The corona generally ranges from , F , C to Matter from the corona is blown off as the solar wind. The strength of the sun's magnetic field is typically only about twice as strong as Earth's field.

However, it becomes highly concentrated in small areas, reaching up to 3, times stronger than usual. These kinks and twists in the magnetic field develop because the sun spins more rapidly at the equator than at the higher latitudes and because the inner parts of the sun rotate more quickly than the surface.

These distortions create features ranging from sunspots to spectacular eruptions known as flares and coronal mass ejections.

Flares are the most violent eruptions in the solar system, while coronal mass ejections are less violent but involve extraordinary amounts of matter — a single ejection can spout roughly 20 billion tons 18 billion metric tons of matter into space.

Just like most other stars, the sun is made up mostly of hydrogen, followed by helium. Nearly all the remaining matter consists of seven other elements — oxygen, carbon, neon, nitrogen, magnesium, iron and silicon.

For every 1 million atoms of hydrogen in the sun, there are 98, of helium, of oxygen, of carbon, of neon, of nitrogen, 40 of magnesium, 35 of iron and 35 of silicon.

With the newspaper's editor at the time, Dominic Mohan, adding underneath:. It's a version of events that 23 years ago The Sun went along with and for that we're deeply ashamed and profoundly sorry.

We've co-operated fully with The Hillsborough Independent Panel and will publish reports of their findings in tomorrow's newspaper.

We will also reflect our deep sense of shame. Liverpool FC supporters and a significant majority of the City of Liverpool's residents have continued to boycott the newspaper as a result of the Hillsborough tragedy.

The newspaper said the decision "is bad for fans and bad for football". The newspaper was banned by Everton F.

The Mayor of Liverpool Joe Anderson described the article as "disgrace" and a "slur" on the city. The Sun remained loyal to Thatcher right up to her resignation in November , [98] despite the party's fall in popularity over the previous year following the introduction of the poll tax officially known as the Community Charge.

This change to the way local government is funded was vociferously supported by the newspaper, despite widespread opposition, some from Conservative MPs , which is seen as having contributed to Thatcher's own downfall.

The tax was quickly repealed by her successor John Major , whom The Sun initially supported enthusiastically, [99] believing the former Chancellor of the Exchequer was a radical Thatcherite.

On the day of the general election of 9 April , its front-page headline, encapsulating its antipathy towards the Labour leader Neil Kinnock , read "If Kinnock wins today, will the last person to leave Britain please turn out the lights".

The Sun led with a headline "Now we've all been screwed by the cabinet" with a reference to Black Wednesday on 17 September , and the exposure a few months earlier of an extra-marital affair in which Cabinet Minister David Mellor was involved.

Despite its initial opposition to the closures, until , the newspaper repeatedly called for the implementation of further Thatcherite policies, such as Royal Mail privatisation, [] [ verification needed ] and social security cutbacks, with leaders such as "Peter Lilley is right, we can't carry on like this".

The Sun 's comment was that "The only serious radicals in British politics these days are the likes of Redwood, Lilley and Portillo".

Between and , The Sun 's circulation peaked. Its highest average sale was in the week ending 16 July , when the daily figure was 4,, The highest ever one-day sale was on 18 November 4,, , although the cover price had been cut to 10p.

The highest ever one-day sale at full price was on 30 March 4,, On 22 January , The Sun accused the shadow chancellor Gordon Brown of stealing the Conservatives' ideas by declaring, "If all he is offering is Conservative financial restraint, why not vote for the real thing?

The Sun switched support to the Labour party on 18 March , six weeks before the General Election victory which saw the New Labour leader Tony Blair become Prime Minister with a large parliamentary majority, despite the paper having attacked Blair and New Labour up to a month earlier.

In exchange for Rupert Murdoch's support, Blair agreed not to join the European Exchange Rate Mechanism which John Major had withdrawn the country from in September after barely two years.

Misjudging public response, The Sun 's editor David Yelland demanded to know in a front-page editorial whether Britain was governed by a "gay mafia" of a "closed world of men with a mutual self-interest".

Three days later the paper apologised in another editorial which said The Sun would never again reveal a person's sexuality unless it could be defended on the grounds of "overwhelming public interest".

In , the paper was accused of racism by the government over its criticisms of what it perceived as the "open door" policy on immigration.

The paper rebutted the claim, believing that it was not racist to suggest that a "tide" of unchecked illegal immigrants was increasing the risk of terrorist attacks and infectious diseases.

It did not help its argument by publishing a front-page story on 4 July , under the headline "Swan Bake", which claimed that asylum seekers were slaughtering and eating swans.

It later proved to have no basis in fact. Subsequently, The Sun published a follow-up headlined "Now they're after our fish!

Following a Press Complaints Commission adjudication a "clarification" was eventually printed, on page The photographs caused outrage across the world and Clarence House was forced to issue a statement in response apologising for any offence or embarrassment caused.

Despite being a persistent critic of some of the government's policies, the paper supported Labour in both subsequent elections the party won.

For the general election , The Sun backed Blair and Labour for a third consecutive election win and vowed to give him "one last chance" to fulfil his promises, despite berating him for several weaknesses including a failure to control immigration.

However, it did speak of its hope that the Conservatives led by Michael Howard would one day be fit for a return to government. When Rebekah Wade now Brooks became editor in , it was thought Page 3 might be dropped.

Wade had tried to persuade David Yelland , her immediate predecessors in the job, to scrap the feature, but a model who shared her first name was used on her first day in the post.

On 22 September , the newspaper appeared to misjudge the public mood surrounding mental health, as well as its affection for former world heavyweight champion boxer Frank Bruno , who had been admitted to hospital, when the headline "Bonkers Bruno Locked Up" appeared on the front page of early editions.

The adverse reaction, once the paper had hit the streets on the evening of 21 September, led to the headline being changed for the paper's second edition to the more sympathetic "Sad Bruno in Mental Home".

The Sun has been openly antagonistic towards other European nations, particularly the French and Germans. During the s and s, the nationalities were routinely described in copy and headlines as "frogs", "krauts" or "hun".

As the paper is opposed to the EU it has referred to foreign leaders who it deemed hostile to the UK in unflattering terms. An unflattering picture of German chancellor Angela Merkel , taken from the rear, bore the headline "I'm Big in the Bumdestag" 17 April Although The Sun was outspoken against the racism directed at Bollywood actress Shilpa Shetty on television reality show Celebrity Big Brother during , the paper captioned a picture on its website, from a Bollywood-themed pop video by Hilary Duff , "Hilary PoppaDuff ", [] a very similar insult to that directed at Shetty.

On 7 January , The Sun ran an exclusive front-page story claiming that participants in a discussion on Ummah.

It was claimed that "Those listed [on the forum] should treat it very seriously. Expect a hate campaign and intimidation by 20 or 30 thugs.

On 9 December , The Sun published a front-page story claiming that terrorist group Al-Qaeda had threatened a terrorist attack on Granada Television in Manchester to disrupt the episode of the soap opera Coronation Street to be transmitted live that evening.

The paper cited unnamed sources, claiming "cops are throwing a ring of steel around tonight's live episode of Coronation Street over fears it has been targeted by Al-Qaeda.

In January , the Wapping presses printed The Sun for the last time and London printing was transferred to Waltham Cross in the Borough of Broxbourne in Hertfordshire, [] where News International had built what is claimed to be the largest printing centre in Europe with 12 presses.

Northern printing had earlier been switched to a new plant at Knowsley on Merseyside and the Scottish Sun to another new plant at Motherwell near Glasgow.

The Waltham Cross plant is capable of producing one million copies an hour of a page tabloid newspaper. Its editorials were critical of many of Brown's policies and often more supportive of those of Conservative leader David Cameron.

Rupert Murdoch , head of The Sun ' s parent company News Corporation, speaking at a meeting with the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications, which was investigating media ownership and the news, said that he acts as a "traditional proprietor".

This means he exercises editorial control on major issues such as which political party to back in a general election or which policy to adopt on Europe.

With " Broken Britain " controversies on issues like crime, immigration and public service failures in the news, on 30 September , following Brown's speech at the Labour Party Conference, The Sun , under the banner "Labour's Lost It", announced that it no longer supported the Labour Party: That day at the Labour Party Conference, union leader Tony Woodley responded by ripping up a copy of that edition of The Sun , remarking as he did so in reference to the newspaper's Hillsborough Disaster controversy: After criticising him for misspelling a dead soldier's mother's name, The Sun was then forced to apologise for misspelling the same name on their website.

The Scottish Sun did not back either Labour or the Conservatives, with its editorial stating it was "yet to be convinced" by the Conservative opposition, and editor David Dinsmore asking in an interview "what is David Cameron going to do for Scotland?

During the campaign for the general election , The Independent ran ads declaring that "Rupert Murdoch won't decide this election — you will.

On election day 6 May , The Sun urged its readers to vote for David Cameron's "modern and positive" Conservatives to save Britain from "disaster" which the paper thought the country would face if the Labour government was re-elected.

The election ended in the first hung parliament after an election for 36 years , with the Tories gaining the most seats and votes but being 20 seats short of an overall majority.

They finally came to power on 11 May when Gordon Brown stepped down as prime minister, paving the way for David Cameron to become prime minister by forming a coalition with the Liberal Democrats.

While other British newspapers had not published the photos in deference to the privacy of members of the Royal Family , editorial staff of The Sun claimed it was a move to test Britain's perception of freedom of the press.

In the photos, which were published on the Internet worldwide, Prince Harry was naked. Following the News of the World phone hacking affair that led to the closure of that paper on 10 July , there was speculation that News International would launch a Sunday edition of The Sun to replace the News of the World.

On 18 July , the LulzSec group hacked The Sun 's website, where they posted a fake news story of Rupert Murdoch's death before redirecting the website to their Twitter page.

The group also targeted the website of The Times. A reporter working for The Sun was arrested and taken to a south-west London police station on 4 November The man was the sixth person to be arrested in the UK under the News International related legal probe, Operation Elveden.

As of 18 January , 22 Sun journalists had been arrested, including their crime reporter Anthony France.

On 28 January , police arrested four current and former staff members of The Sun , [] as part of a probe in which journalists paid police officers for information; a police officer was also arrested in the probe.

The Sun staffers arrested were crime editor Mike Sullivan, head of news Chris Pharo, former deputy editor Fergus Shanahan, and former managing editor Graham Dudman, who since became a columnist and media writer.

All five arrested were held on suspicion of corruption. Police also searched the offices of News International, the publishers of The Sun , as part of a continuing investigation into the News of the World scandal.

On 11 February , five senior journalists at The Sun were arrested, including the deputy editor , as part of Operation Elveden the investigation into payments to UK public servants.

Coinciding with a visit to The Sun newsroom on 17 February , Murdoch announced via an email that the arrested journalists, who had been suspended, would return to work as nothing had been proved against them.

On 27 February , the day after the debut of The Sun on Sunday , Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers told the Leveson Inquiry that police were investigating a "network of corrupt officials" as part of their inquiries into phone hacking and police corruption.

She said evidence suggested a "culture of illegal payments" at The Sun authorised at a senior level. On 12 and 13 June , to tie in with the beginning of the World Cup football tournament, a free special issue of The Sun was distributed by the Royal Mail to 22 million homes in England.

The boycott in Merseyside following the newspaper's coverage of the Hillsborough disaster in meant that copies were not dispatched to areas with a Liverpool postcode.

The main party leaders, David Cameron , Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband , were all depicted holding a copy of the special issue in publicity material.

Promoted as "an unapologetic celebration of England", the special issue of The Sun ran to 24 pages. At her subsequent trial, the case against Tulisa collapsed at Southwark Crown Court in July , with the judge commenting that there were "strong grounds" to believe that Mahmood had lied at a pre-trial hearing and tried to manipulate evidence against the co-defendant Tulisa.

After these events, The Sun released a statement saying that the newspaper "takes the Judge's remarks very seriously. Mahmood has been suspended pending an immediate internal investigation.

In October , the trial of six senior staff and journalists at The Sun newspaper began. All six were charged with conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office.

They included The Sun ' s head of news Chris Pharo, who faced six charges, while ex-managing editor Graham Dudman and ex- Sun deputy news editor Ben O'Driscoll were accused of four charges each.

Thames Valley district reporter Jamie Pyatt and picture editor John Edwards were charged with three counts each, while ex-reporter John Troup was accused of two counts.

The trial related to illegal payments allegedly made to public officials, with prosecutors saying the men conspired to pay officials from to , including police, prison officers and soldiers.

They were accused of buying confidential information about the Royal Family, public figures and prison inmates.

They all denied the charges. The jury also partially cleared O'Driscoll and Dudman but continued deliberating over other counts faced by them, as well as the charges against Pharo and Pyatt.

Shortly afterwards, one of the jurors sent a note to the judge and was discharged. The judge told the remaining 11 jurors that their colleague had been "feeling unwell and feeling under a great deal of pressure and stress from the situation you are in", and that under the circumstances he was prepared to accept majority verdicts of "11 to zero or 10 to 1".

Two days earlier, Marks had emailed counsel for the defendants, telling them: The journalist, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is appealing the verdict".

Defence counsel for the four journalists threatened to take the decision to judicial review, with the barrister representing Pharo, Nigel Rumfitt QC, saying: He added that the defendants were "extremely concerned" and "entitled" to know why Marks was being replaced by Wide.

In a separate trial, Sun reporter Nick Parker was cleared on 9 December of aiding and abetting misconduct in a public office but found guilty of handling a stolen mobile phone belonging to Labour MP Siobhain McDonagh.

On 22 May , Sun reporter Anthony France was found guilty of aiding and abetting misconduct in a public office between and France's trial followed the London Metropolitan Police 's Operation Elveden , an ongoing investigation into alleged payments to police and officials in exchange for information.

The police officer had already pleaded guilty to misconduct in a public office and given a two-year gaol sentence in , but the jury in France's trial was not informed of this.

Following the passing of the guilty verdict, the officer leading Operation Elveden, Detective Chief Superintendent Gordon Briggs said France and Edwards had been in a "long-term, corrupt relationship".

The BBC reported that France was the first journalist to face trial and be convicted under Operation Elveden since the Crown Prosecution Service CPS had revised its guidance in April so that prosecutions would only be brought against journalists who had made payments to police officers over a period of time.

As a result of the change in the CPS' policy, charges against several journalists who had made payments to other types of public officials — including civil servants, health workers and prison staff — had been dropped.

Judge Timothy Pontius said in court that France's illegal actions had been part of a "clearly recognised procedure at The Sun ", adding that, "There can be no doubt that News International bears some measure of moral responsibility if not legal culpability for the acts of the defendant".

The Private Eye report noted that despite this The Sun 's parent organisation was "considering disciplinary actions" against France whilst at the same time it was also preparing to bring a case to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal against the London Metropolitan Police Service for its actions relating to him and two other journalists.

The Sun defended Page 3 for more than 40 years, with then editor Dominic Mohan telling the Leveson Inquiry into press standards, in February , that "Page 3" was an "innocuous British Institution, regarded with affection and tolerance.

Apart from the edition of 22 January, the conventional Page 3 feature of a topless model has not returned, and has effectively ended.

On 17 April , The Sun 's columnist Katie Hopkins called migrants to Britain "cockroaches" and "feral humans" and said they were "spreading like the norovirus".

In a statement released on 24 April , High Commissioner Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein stated that Hopkins' used "language very similar to that employed by Rwanda's Kangura newspaper and Radio Mille Collines during the run up to the genocide ", and noted that both media organisations were subsequently convicted by an international tribunal of public incitement to commit genocide.

Numerous sources suggested the column used language reminiscent of Nazi propaganda and Nazi phrases. A statement by the groups said "The printing of the phrase 'The Muslim Problem' — particularly with the capitalisation and italics for emphasis — in a national newspaper sets a dangerous precedent, and harks back to the use of the phrase 'The Jewish problem in the last century, to which the Nazis responded with 'The Final Solution ' — the Holocaust ".

The letter stated the MPs "were truly outraged by the hate and bigotry" in Kavanagh's column. It claimed that in at Windsor Castle , while having lunch with Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg , the monarch criticised the union.

Clegg denied that the Queen made such a statement, and a Buckingham Palace spokesperson confirmed that a complaint had been made to the Independent Press Standards Organisation over a breach of guidelines relating to accuracy.

The Sun officially endorsed the Leave campaign in the British referendum to remain in or leave the European Union on 23 June , urging its readers to vote for the United Kingdom to leave the EU.

It was in relation to disputes over the sovereignty of Gibraltar following the EU referendum. The middle pages featured a poster with the message "Hands off our rock".

In June , a redesign of The Sun 's website was launched. The paper critiqued Steele for her decision to "cover up from head to toe" and told her to "flash a bit of flesh".

The paper, and the journalist responsible for the piece, Tracey Lea Sayer, subsequently apologised.

Sayer reported that when she wrote the article she was not aware of the age of Steele. Based in Glasgow, it duplicates much of the content of the main edition but with alternative coverage of Scottish news and sport.

The launch editor was Jack Irvine who had been recruited from the Daily Record. In the early s, the Scottish edition declared support for the pro-independence Scottish National Party.

At the time the paper elsewhere continued to support the Conservatives, who were then becoming an increasingly marginalised force in Scotland.

However, the Scottish Sun had performed a U-turn by the time of the Scottish parliamentary election , in which its front page featured a hangman's noose in the shape of an SNP logo, stating "Vote SNP today and you put Scotland's head in the noose".

On 17 September, the day before the poll, an editorial commented: While in England and Wales, the paper saw a vote for the Conservatives as a means to "stop [the] SNP running the country", the edition north of the border said the SNP would "fight harder for Scotland's interests at Westminster".

The Irish edition of the newspaper, based in Dublin, is known as the Irish Sun , with a regional sub-edition for Northern Ireland where it is mastheaded as The Sun , based in Belfast.

It often views stories in a very different light to those being reported in the UK editions. Editions of the paper in Great Britain described the film The Wind That Shakes the Barley as being "designed to drag the reputation of our nation through the mud" and "the most pro-IRA ever"; [] conversely, the Republic of Ireland edition praised the film and described it as giving "the Brits a tanning".

The Irish Sun , unlike its sister papers in Great Britain, did not have a designated website until late An unaffiliated news site with the name Irish Sun has been in operation since mid Polski Sun was a Polish-language version of the newspaper which ran for six issues in June during the UEFA Euro football tournament, on the days of and the days after Poland played matches.

Each issue had a circulation of 50,—75,, in relation to the estimated , Poles in the United Kingdom at the time. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Tabloid newspaper from the United Kingdom and Ireland. This article is about the British tabloid newspaper. For the American supermarket tabloid, see Sun supermarket tabloid.

For other newspapers and publications titled Sun or The Sun, see Sun newspaper. Front page of The Sun , 7 October [1] [2].

Retrieved 15 July Retrieved 2 September Retrieved 8 November Retrieved 30 April Retrieved 7 June Retrieved 12 April Archived from the original on 5 February Retrieved 19 February No, it's that new Sun on Sunday".

Retrieved 19 January Retrieved 11 June Retrieved 11 November Check date values in: Stick it up your punter! Popular newspapers, the Labour Party and British politics.

Pan Macmillan, [], p. Retrieved 14 June From Safari Suits to Sexploitation , London: A History of the British Newspaper , Abingdon: Archived from the original on 23 December Retrieved 29 April Pocket Books, , p.

Oxford University Press, , p. Edinburgh University Preess, , p. Retrieved 4 May Read All About It , London: Random House, , p.

University of Minnesota, , p. Retrieved 1 February

The sun -

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Most of the material was pulled toward the center to form the sun. The sun has enough nuclear fuel to stay much as it is now for another 5 billion years.

After that, it will swell to become a red giant. Eventually, it will shed its outer layers, and the remaining core will collapse to become a white dwarf.

Slowly, this will fade, to enter its final phase as a dim, cool theoretical object sometimes known as a black dwarf. The sun and its atmosphere are divided into several zones and layers.

The solar interior, from the inside out, is made up of the core, radiative zone and the convective zone.

The solar atmosphere above that consists of the photosphere, chromosphere, a transition region and the corona. Beyond that is the solar wind , an outflow of gas from the corona.

The core extends from the sun's center to about a quarter of the way to its surface. Although it only makes up roughly 2 percent of the sun's volume, it is almost 15 times the density of lead and holds nearly half of the sun's mass.

Next is the radiative zone, which extends from the core to 70 percent of the way to the sun's surface, making up 32 percent of the sun's volume and 48 percent of its mass.

Light from the core gets scattered in this zone, so that a single photon often may take a million years to pass through. The convection zone reaches up to the sun's surface, and makes up 66 percent of the sun's volume but only a little more than 2 percent of its mass.

Roiling "convection cells" of gas dominate this zone. Two main kinds of solar convection cells exist — granulation cells about miles 1, kilometers wide and supergranulation cells about 20, miles 30, km in diameter.

The photosphere is the lowest layer of the sun's atmosphere, and emits the light we see. It is about miles km thick, although most of the light comes from its lowest third.

Temperatures in the photosphere range from 11, F 6, C at bottom to 7, F 4, C at top. Next up is the chromosphere, which is hotter, up to 35, F 19, C , and is apparently made up entirely of spiky structures known as spicules typically some miles 1, km across and up to 6, miles 10, km high.

After that is the transition region a few hundred to a few thousand miles thick, which is heated by the corona above it and sheds most of its light as ultraviolet rays.

At the top is the super-hot corona, which is made of structures such as loops and streams of ionized gas. The corona generally ranges from , F , C to Matter from the corona is blown off as the solar wind.

The strength of the sun's magnetic field is typically only about twice as strong as Earth's field. However, it becomes highly concentrated in small areas, reaching up to 3, times stronger than usual.

These kinks and twists in the magnetic field develop because the sun spins more rapidly at the equator than at the higher latitudes and because the inner parts of the sun rotate more quickly than the surface.

These distortions create features ranging from sunspots to spectacular eruptions known as flares and coronal mass ejections. Flares are the most violent eruptions in the solar system, while coronal mass ejections are less violent but involve extraordinary amounts of matter — a single ejection can spout roughly 20 billion tons 18 billion metric tons of matter into space.

Just like most other stars, the sun is made up mostly of hydrogen, followed by helium. Nearly all the remaining matter consists of seven other elements — oxygen, carbon, neon, nitrogen, magnesium, iron and silicon.

For every 1 million atoms of hydrogen in the sun, there are 98, of helium, of oxygen, of carbon, of neon, of nitrogen, 40 of magnesium, 35 of iron and 35 of silicon.

Still, hydrogen is the lightest of all elements, so it only accounts for roughly 72 percent of the sun's mass, while helium makes up about 26 percent.

When Rebekah Wade now Brooks became editor in , it was thought Page 3 might be dropped. Wade had tried to persuade David Yelland , her immediate predecessors in the job, to scrap the feature, but a model who shared her first name was used on her first day in the post.

On 22 September , the newspaper appeared to misjudge the public mood surrounding mental health, as well as its affection for former world heavyweight champion boxer Frank Bruno , who had been admitted to hospital, when the headline "Bonkers Bruno Locked Up" appeared on the front page of early editions.

The adverse reaction, once the paper had hit the streets on the evening of 21 September, led to the headline being changed for the paper's second edition to the more sympathetic "Sad Bruno in Mental Home".

The Sun has been openly antagonistic towards other European nations, particularly the French and Germans. During the s and s, the nationalities were routinely described in copy and headlines as "frogs", "krauts" or "hun".

As the paper is opposed to the EU it has referred to foreign leaders who it deemed hostile to the UK in unflattering terms. An unflattering picture of German chancellor Angela Merkel , taken from the rear, bore the headline "I'm Big in the Bumdestag" 17 April Although The Sun was outspoken against the racism directed at Bollywood actress Shilpa Shetty on television reality show Celebrity Big Brother during , the paper captioned a picture on its website, from a Bollywood-themed pop video by Hilary Duff , "Hilary PoppaDuff ", [] a very similar insult to that directed at Shetty.

On 7 January , The Sun ran an exclusive front-page story claiming that participants in a discussion on Ummah. It was claimed that "Those listed [on the forum] should treat it very seriously.

Expect a hate campaign and intimidation by 20 or 30 thugs. On 9 December , The Sun published a front-page story claiming that terrorist group Al-Qaeda had threatened a terrorist attack on Granada Television in Manchester to disrupt the episode of the soap opera Coronation Street to be transmitted live that evening.

The paper cited unnamed sources, claiming "cops are throwing a ring of steel around tonight's live episode of Coronation Street over fears it has been targeted by Al-Qaeda.

In January , the Wapping presses printed The Sun for the last time and London printing was transferred to Waltham Cross in the Borough of Broxbourne in Hertfordshire, [] where News International had built what is claimed to be the largest printing centre in Europe with 12 presses.

Northern printing had earlier been switched to a new plant at Knowsley on Merseyside and the Scottish Sun to another new plant at Motherwell near Glasgow.

The Waltham Cross plant is capable of producing one million copies an hour of a page tabloid newspaper. Its editorials were critical of many of Brown's policies and often more supportive of those of Conservative leader David Cameron.

Rupert Murdoch , head of The Sun ' s parent company News Corporation, speaking at a meeting with the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications, which was investigating media ownership and the news, said that he acts as a "traditional proprietor".

This means he exercises editorial control on major issues such as which political party to back in a general election or which policy to adopt on Europe.

With " Broken Britain " controversies on issues like crime, immigration and public service failures in the news, on 30 September , following Brown's speech at the Labour Party Conference, The Sun , under the banner "Labour's Lost It", announced that it no longer supported the Labour Party: That day at the Labour Party Conference, union leader Tony Woodley responded by ripping up a copy of that edition of The Sun , remarking as he did so in reference to the newspaper's Hillsborough Disaster controversy: After criticising him for misspelling a dead soldier's mother's name, The Sun was then forced to apologise for misspelling the same name on their website.

The Scottish Sun did not back either Labour or the Conservatives, with its editorial stating it was "yet to be convinced" by the Conservative opposition, and editor David Dinsmore asking in an interview "what is David Cameron going to do for Scotland?

During the campaign for the general election , The Independent ran ads declaring that "Rupert Murdoch won't decide this election — you will.

On election day 6 May , The Sun urged its readers to vote for David Cameron's "modern and positive" Conservatives to save Britain from "disaster" which the paper thought the country would face if the Labour government was re-elected.

The election ended in the first hung parliament after an election for 36 years , with the Tories gaining the most seats and votes but being 20 seats short of an overall majority.

They finally came to power on 11 May when Gordon Brown stepped down as prime minister, paving the way for David Cameron to become prime minister by forming a coalition with the Liberal Democrats.

While other British newspapers had not published the photos in deference to the privacy of members of the Royal Family , editorial staff of The Sun claimed it was a move to test Britain's perception of freedom of the press.

In the photos, which were published on the Internet worldwide, Prince Harry was naked. Following the News of the World phone hacking affair that led to the closure of that paper on 10 July , there was speculation that News International would launch a Sunday edition of The Sun to replace the News of the World.

On 18 July , the LulzSec group hacked The Sun 's website, where they posted a fake news story of Rupert Murdoch's death before redirecting the website to their Twitter page.

The group also targeted the website of The Times. A reporter working for The Sun was arrested and taken to a south-west London police station on 4 November The man was the sixth person to be arrested in the UK under the News International related legal probe, Operation Elveden.

As of 18 January , 22 Sun journalists had been arrested, including their crime reporter Anthony France. On 28 January , police arrested four current and former staff members of The Sun , [] as part of a probe in which journalists paid police officers for information; a police officer was also arrested in the probe.

The Sun staffers arrested were crime editor Mike Sullivan, head of news Chris Pharo, former deputy editor Fergus Shanahan, and former managing editor Graham Dudman, who since became a columnist and media writer.

All five arrested were held on suspicion of corruption. Police also searched the offices of News International, the publishers of The Sun , as part of a continuing investigation into the News of the World scandal.

On 11 February , five senior journalists at The Sun were arrested, including the deputy editor , as part of Operation Elveden the investigation into payments to UK public servants.

Coinciding with a visit to The Sun newsroom on 17 February , Murdoch announced via an email that the arrested journalists, who had been suspended, would return to work as nothing had been proved against them.

On 27 February , the day after the debut of The Sun on Sunday , Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers told the Leveson Inquiry that police were investigating a "network of corrupt officials" as part of their inquiries into phone hacking and police corruption.

She said evidence suggested a "culture of illegal payments" at The Sun authorised at a senior level.

On 12 and 13 June , to tie in with the beginning of the World Cup football tournament, a free special issue of The Sun was distributed by the Royal Mail to 22 million homes in England.

The boycott in Merseyside following the newspaper's coverage of the Hillsborough disaster in meant that copies were not dispatched to areas with a Liverpool postcode.

The main party leaders, David Cameron , Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband , were all depicted holding a copy of the special issue in publicity material.

Promoted as "an unapologetic celebration of England", the special issue of The Sun ran to 24 pages. At her subsequent trial, the case against Tulisa collapsed at Southwark Crown Court in July , with the judge commenting that there were "strong grounds" to believe that Mahmood had lied at a pre-trial hearing and tried to manipulate evidence against the co-defendant Tulisa.

After these events, The Sun released a statement saying that the newspaper "takes the Judge's remarks very seriously.

Mahmood has been suspended pending an immediate internal investigation. In October , the trial of six senior staff and journalists at The Sun newspaper began.

All six were charged with conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office. They included The Sun ' s head of news Chris Pharo, who faced six charges, while ex-managing editor Graham Dudman and ex- Sun deputy news editor Ben O'Driscoll were accused of four charges each.

Thames Valley district reporter Jamie Pyatt and picture editor John Edwards were charged with three counts each, while ex-reporter John Troup was accused of two counts.

The trial related to illegal payments allegedly made to public officials, with prosecutors saying the men conspired to pay officials from to , including police, prison officers and soldiers.

They were accused of buying confidential information about the Royal Family, public figures and prison inmates. They all denied the charges.

The jury also partially cleared O'Driscoll and Dudman but continued deliberating over other counts faced by them, as well as the charges against Pharo and Pyatt.

Shortly afterwards, one of the jurors sent a note to the judge and was discharged. The judge told the remaining 11 jurors that their colleague had been "feeling unwell and feeling under a great deal of pressure and stress from the situation you are in", and that under the circumstances he was prepared to accept majority verdicts of "11 to zero or 10 to 1".

Two days earlier, Marks had emailed counsel for the defendants, telling them: The journalist, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is appealing the verdict".

Defence counsel for the four journalists threatened to take the decision to judicial review, with the barrister representing Pharo, Nigel Rumfitt QC, saying: He added that the defendants were "extremely concerned" and "entitled" to know why Marks was being replaced by Wide.

In a separate trial, Sun reporter Nick Parker was cleared on 9 December of aiding and abetting misconduct in a public office but found guilty of handling a stolen mobile phone belonging to Labour MP Siobhain McDonagh.

On 22 May , Sun reporter Anthony France was found guilty of aiding and abetting misconduct in a public office between and France's trial followed the London Metropolitan Police 's Operation Elveden , an ongoing investigation into alleged payments to police and officials in exchange for information.

The police officer had already pleaded guilty to misconduct in a public office and given a two-year gaol sentence in , but the jury in France's trial was not informed of this.

Following the passing of the guilty verdict, the officer leading Operation Elveden, Detective Chief Superintendent Gordon Briggs said France and Edwards had been in a "long-term, corrupt relationship".

The BBC reported that France was the first journalist to face trial and be convicted under Operation Elveden since the Crown Prosecution Service CPS had revised its guidance in April so that prosecutions would only be brought against journalists who had made payments to police officers over a period of time.

As a result of the change in the CPS' policy, charges against several journalists who had made payments to other types of public officials — including civil servants, health workers and prison staff — had been dropped.

Judge Timothy Pontius said in court that France's illegal actions had been part of a "clearly recognised procedure at The Sun ", adding that, "There can be no doubt that News International bears some measure of moral responsibility if not legal culpability for the acts of the defendant".

The Private Eye report noted that despite this The Sun 's parent organisation was "considering disciplinary actions" against France whilst at the same time it was also preparing to bring a case to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal against the London Metropolitan Police Service for its actions relating to him and two other journalists.

The Sun defended Page 3 for more than 40 years, with then editor Dominic Mohan telling the Leveson Inquiry into press standards, in February , that "Page 3" was an "innocuous British Institution, regarded with affection and tolerance.

Apart from the edition of 22 January, the conventional Page 3 feature of a topless model has not returned, and has effectively ended.

On 17 April , The Sun 's columnist Katie Hopkins called migrants to Britain "cockroaches" and "feral humans" and said they were "spreading like the norovirus".

In a statement released on 24 April , High Commissioner Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein stated that Hopkins' used "language very similar to that employed by Rwanda's Kangura newspaper and Radio Mille Collines during the run up to the genocide ", and noted that both media organisations were subsequently convicted by an international tribunal of public incitement to commit genocide.

Numerous sources suggested the column used language reminiscent of Nazi propaganda and Nazi phrases.

A statement by the groups said "The printing of the phrase 'The Muslim Problem' — particularly with the capitalisation and italics for emphasis — in a national newspaper sets a dangerous precedent, and harks back to the use of the phrase 'The Jewish problem in the last century, to which the Nazis responded with 'The Final Solution ' — the Holocaust ".

The letter stated the MPs "were truly outraged by the hate and bigotry" in Kavanagh's column. It claimed that in at Windsor Castle , while having lunch with Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg , the monarch criticised the union.

Clegg denied that the Queen made such a statement, and a Buckingham Palace spokesperson confirmed that a complaint had been made to the Independent Press Standards Organisation over a breach of guidelines relating to accuracy.

The Sun officially endorsed the Leave campaign in the British referendum to remain in or leave the European Union on 23 June , urging its readers to vote for the United Kingdom to leave the EU.

It was in relation to disputes over the sovereignty of Gibraltar following the EU referendum. The middle pages featured a poster with the message "Hands off our rock".

In June , a redesign of The Sun 's website was launched. The paper critiqued Steele for her decision to "cover up from head to toe" and told her to "flash a bit of flesh".

The paper, and the journalist responsible for the piece, Tracey Lea Sayer, subsequently apologised. Sayer reported that when she wrote the article she was not aware of the age of Steele.

Based in Glasgow, it duplicates much of the content of the main edition but with alternative coverage of Scottish news and sport. The launch editor was Jack Irvine who had been recruited from the Daily Record.

In the early s, the Scottish edition declared support for the pro-independence Scottish National Party. At the time the paper elsewhere continued to support the Conservatives, who were then becoming an increasingly marginalised force in Scotland.

However, the Scottish Sun had performed a U-turn by the time of the Scottish parliamentary election , in which its front page featured a hangman's noose in the shape of an SNP logo, stating "Vote SNP today and you put Scotland's head in the noose".

On 17 September, the day before the poll, an editorial commented: While in England and Wales, the paper saw a vote for the Conservatives as a means to "stop [the] SNP running the country", the edition north of the border said the SNP would "fight harder for Scotland's interests at Westminster".

The Irish edition of the newspaper, based in Dublin, is known as the Irish Sun , with a regional sub-edition for Northern Ireland where it is mastheaded as The Sun , based in Belfast.

It often views stories in a very different light to those being reported in the UK editions. Editions of the paper in Great Britain described the film The Wind That Shakes the Barley as being "designed to drag the reputation of our nation through the mud" and "the most pro-IRA ever"; [] conversely, the Republic of Ireland edition praised the film and described it as giving "the Brits a tanning".

The Irish Sun , unlike its sister papers in Great Britain, did not have a designated website until late An unaffiliated news site with the name Irish Sun has been in operation since mid Polski Sun was a Polish-language version of the newspaper which ran for six issues in June during the UEFA Euro football tournament, on the days of and the days after Poland played matches.

Each issue had a circulation of 50,—75,, in relation to the estimated , Poles in the United Kingdom at the time. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Tabloid newspaper from the United Kingdom and Ireland. This article is about the British tabloid newspaper. For the American supermarket tabloid, see Sun supermarket tabloid.

For other newspapers and publications titled Sun or The Sun, see Sun newspaper. Front page of The Sun , 7 October [1] [2].

Retrieved 15 July Retrieved 2 September Retrieved 8 November Retrieved 30 April Retrieved 7 June Retrieved 12 April Archived from the original on 5 February Retrieved 19 February No, it's that new Sun on Sunday".

Retrieved 19 January Retrieved 11 June Retrieved 11 November Check date values in: Stick it up your punter! Popular newspapers, the Labour Party and British politics.

Pan Macmillan, [], p. Retrieved 14 June From Safari Suits to Sexploitation , London: A History of the British Newspaper , Abingdon: Archived from the original on 23 December Retrieved 29 April Pocket Books, , p.

Oxford University Press, , p. Edinburgh University Preess, , p. Retrieved 4 May Read All About It , London: Random House, , p. University of Minnesota, , p.

Retrieved 1 February News, Truth, and Power , Routledge, , p. The Media and the British Left , Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, , p.

News, Truth, and Power. Retrieved 15 October Archived from the original on 17 July Retrieved 29 June Retrieved 13 August Retrieved 23 February Kelvin MacKenzie offers 'profuse apologies to the people of Liverpool ' ".

Retrieved 14 September Retrieved 22 May Retrieved 10 February Retrieved 15 April Sack Kelvin MacKenzie over Barkley article".

Retrieved 20 September Archived from the original on 11 January Archived from the original on 11 December Guardian News and Media.

Retrieved 19 October Archived from the original on 5 September Retrieved 3 January Archived from the original on 21 January Retrieved 4 July Right-wing extremist who killed 77 people in Norway massacre wins part of human rights case".

Retrieved 27 December Inquiry into Media Ownership and the News. House of Commons Select Committee on Communications. Archived from the original on 1 December Retrieved 2 May Retrieved 25 May The Sun defies Royal Family to print naked pictures".

Telegraph Media Group Limited. Retrieved 24 August

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